Premenstrual Syndrome and Marijuana Information: Treat PMS With Cannabis

Premenstrual syndrome (known as PMS) involves a variety of physical, mental, and behavioral symptoms tied to a woman’s menstrual cycle. By definition, symptoms occur during the two weeks before a woman’s period starts, known as the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The symptoms typically become more intense in the 2-3 days prior to the period and usually resolve after the first day or two of flow.

Common physical symptoms include:

  • Bloating, weight gain
  • Fatigue, lack of energy
  • Headaches
  • Cramps, aching muscles and joints, low back pain
  • Breast swelling and tenderness
  • Food cravings, especially for sweet or salty foods
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Low sex drive
  • Constipation or diarrhea

Mood and behavior symptoms include:

  • Sad or depressed mood
  • Anger, irritability, aggression
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Decreased alertness, trouble concentrating
  • Withdrawal from family and friends

Clinical Information Related to Premenstrual Syndrome and Medical Marijuana

(Links Coming Soon)

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